Fancy Punkins’


Punkins

Silvery blue Punkins on the outside, vivid orange inside, Jarrahdale squashes are almost too pretty to eat. So decorate your doorstep for a day, then bake it in a pie (or something more interesting).

 

 

 

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A very old favorite from the old central market in Paris in the 1880s, and as pretty as it’s meat is sweet, the rouge vif d’etampes (red stamps) may be French, but it has a long history in America. Make a new tradition with a devilish jack-o’-lantern for Halloween, or maybe a soup or side dish for Thanksgiving.

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It may be too small for a jack-o’-lantern, but the Carnival and its cousin the Sweet Dumpling Punkins still make good decorations, and … well, if not dumplings, then maybe pumpkin ravioli.

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Like a vision right out of Cinderella, the Punkins known as Fairytale has the high, deeply ridged cheeks that are often found in the older varieties. The greenish-brown coloration of the skin makes it very decorative. It could be the biggest jack-o’-lantern on the block.

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The Long Island CheeseĀ is a pumpkin that is flat, tan, and utterly delicious. Inside is a buttery orange. Dry, non-stringy meat produces the most delicious pies, much favored by gourmet bakers.

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Another pumpkin with a French heritage, the Muscade de Provence is ripe even when its skin is mostly green. Inside, it’s all orange, with a very characteristic pumpkin flavor. Substitute it for any pumpkin recipe, or carve it for a twisted Halloween surprise.

Now go bake something..PLEASE?


About JayCooper

Puzzled WebWizard from Mount Juliet Tennessee. Married for 20+ years to a wonderful wife with two great boys, both teens.

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